Multi-Family Properties

Are you a professional juggler? If you're managing commercial real estate, you certainly are: when you're working with tenants in multiple commercial properties, you need to find a way to make all of the pieces come together to ensure business success. Here's how to face some of the unique challenges of commercial real estate management.

Apartment management can feel like you’re in the rodeo. It’s a decidedly up and down job. As soon as you solve one problem, another one throws you up in the air. How can you solve your apartment management problems and have a smoother ride? These six tips can help simplify your property management.

Any property owner knows that while property management can sometimes flow smoothly, it's often a road that's full of negotiation and problem-solving. If you own and manage multiple properties, the number of problems you manage on a daily basis increases. House and condo property management can be overwhelming. This is especially true if you live far away from your property or if you simply can't give it daily attention. If you want your property to be a source of income security but not a source of daily headaches, here's how to make property management easier.

Are you looking to get into the multi-family rental market or do you currently own a multi-family property?  Multi-family properties can be a great investment, but more isn't always better or easier: More homes can mean more hassle. If you're trying to decide whether you should purchase a multi-family property, it's important to consider some of the associated challenges before you buy. But don't despair, there are hassle-free ways to meet those challenges.

A pool or a short walk to the library: what do your tenants expect in a property? Different property amenities have their season, and what was important several years ago or to one generation isn't necessarily important to the next. What do tenants expect, and what do they consider to be a wonderful bonus?

In many cities, the condominium market is hot. In Seattle, some folks are looking to catch the tech wave and live in a place that's close to work and entertainment, while others want to live in high-density, low maintenance homes in walkable neighborhoods. As a property owner, this inflow of motivated buyers can also mean an inflow of keen tenants, as many people decide to commit to a location but not to home ownership. This means that as an owner, you need to learn how to work with the unique condominium market.